The Courting Campaign

The Courting Campaign is the first in the series by Regina Scott. I actually read this series completely out of order, so this was the last book I read. Each story stands independently but shares some common characters (including lovable match-making servants), making all of the books thoroughly enjoyable even out of order. Regina’s stories vary in their faith content, from not mentioning God at all to having it as a large part of the character’s life. This story includes a focus on faith but never overwhelms the story.

One aspect that I really love of the storyline is the focus on natural science and the development of a pivotal invention that had never occurred before to me, but was so important to a major industry. Vague enough? I’m trying not to give anything away! Nicholas goes through several experiments and I think Regina does a good job of describing them. He is certainly singularly focused, to the detriment of his relationship with his daughter, which is where Nanny Emma come in. During a period of time where “A woman must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages, to deserve the word,” Emma shines as STEM beacon. (For those not familiar with the term? Here’s a good article.)

Overall this was an enjoyable story that I’ll read again. It was a good way to spend some enjoyable hours; light-hearted, but with enough depth and character development to give it some levity.

 
CourtingCampaignEmma Pyrmont has no designs on handsome Sir Nicholas Rotherford—at least not for herself. As his daughter’s nanny, she sees how lonely little Alice has been. With the cook’s help, Emma shows the workaholic scientist just what Alice needs. But making Nicholas a better father makes Emma wish her painful past didn’t mar her own marriage chances. 

Ever since scandal destroyed his career, Nicholas has devoted himself to his new invention. Now his daughter’s sweet, quick-witted nanny is proving an unexpected distraction. All evidence suggests that happiness is within reach—if only a man of logic can trust in the deductions of his own heart.

 

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